Searching for @Legacy

What brings readers to @Legacy?

It’s something we ask ourselves often as we prepare new posts. We’re here to give you an inside look at Legacy.com, and we do our best to provide useful and insightful content that keeps you coming back. We know some of our readers are regulars, folks who have subscriptions to the blog or who click through whenever we post a blog story on our Facebook page.

But people also discover us for the first time, all the time. A lot of them come to us via search engines, where they’ve typed in a keyword or phrase that gave them one of our stories as a top result. Our blog software lets us know what keywords lead people to us, and we like to keep an eye on those search terms, because they let us know what people want out of @Legacy. And, to be completely honest, some of them just give us a grin.

We thought you might get a kick out of some of them, too – and find interest in what brings your fellow readers to @Legacy. So today we’re sharing some top search terms, as well as some of our favorite unusual ones.

After “Legacy.com” (which is fairly obvious), the top search term on the list is pretty much always “how to write an obituary.” Also right up there are variations on the wording like “writing an obituary” and “how to write obituaries.” This has never surprised us, because we know it’s a terribly hard task at any time, and it’s often made worse when you have to do it under deadline pressure and in the midst of deep grief. That’s why we offered an obituary-writing guide in the early days of this blog – and it’s consistently our most-viewed story.

Closely following our obit-writing tips in the search terms are a couple I wouldn’t have guessed at: “funny obituaries” and “interesting obituaries.” Certainly, we are connoisseurs of interesting obituaries, and we have published a few stories on them (with another one on Katie’s to-do list for later this fall), but I wouldn’t have guessed so many people were searching for them. Something to keep in mind for those of us who like to stand out – you can keep doing so even after your death if you have a funny or interesting obituary!

Some of our top search terms are more specific – like the next most popular one, “Peter Robbins Charlie Brown.” Along with one that comes just a little farther down the list, “Christopher Shea Linus,” it’ll lead you to a story Katie wrote about the Guest Book for Christopher Shea, who voiced Linus in the Charlie Brown TV specials. We were touched by his Guest Book, and based on the number of people finding the story via our blog, lots of other folks find it special too. Another person whose name is often Googled, leading to us, is Caroline Knapp. Her memoir, “Drinking: A Love Story,” has helped many people who struggle with addiction, and as they look for more information on her they may find the 5 Entries from her Guest Book we shared. And of course, there’s Stopher Bartol, our CEO, for whom many people search by name on Google – and they are lucky enough to find the insightful posts he’s written for @Legacy about the ins and outs of our business.

Then there’s “what to say in an obituary Guest Book,” along with similar phrases like “what to write after a death,” “condolence poems,” and lots more. Anyone who does our job knows how important Guest Books are, and we know just as well how hard it can be to find the right words. I’ve made it one of my goals on this blog to make sure no one ever turns away from the Guest Book in frustration and gives up, because they can’t think of the right thing to say. I’m going to continue offering advice on this whenever I’ve got good new tips to share.

Those are the big ones – we’ve found that the vast majority of new readers come to our blog for help with writing an obituary or a Guest Book entry, to read a funny or interesting or inspiring obituary, or to learn more about someone who has been featured on the blog or who has written for it. But the fun part is finding those odd little search terms that come up just once…

Photo hug.” Aww. This one made me happy. We have posted at least one Photo of the Week featuring a hug. I hope the person who was searching for a photo hug liked what they found.

80s big hair.” I had it & I am glad someone is still interested in reading about it.

Writing about nosy.” Honestly, I could not tell you what this person was looking for, but they found Susan Soper’s piece about the joy of writing about other peoples’ lives.

History of telecommuting.” We may not have been much help on this one, but I hope they enjoyed the read.

Yes true more.” Typing this into a search engine feels kind of like closing your eyes, spinning around, and pointing at a map to decide your vacation destination, but it led them to an interesting piece that had all three words in the title. (Maybe that means it’s a good way to pick a vacation spot, too.)

Rainy days give me a feeling of melancholy.” Me too.

About Linnea

I joined Legacy.com in 2000 as an obituary writer. In the years since, I've done a little of everything for our Operations team, from content review to customer service to creating web pages for funeral homes to training new employees to my current position, Content Manager. I love this position, because I get to write little bits & longer pieces - whatever's needed at the moment - and I get to proofread a lot, satisfying my inner nitpicker. And I love being on the blog team, because I get to write interesting features for the blog. I love to write! In my spare time, I... can you guess?... write. I'm hoping that one day I can add "published novelist" to my bio. I also enjoy working in my vegetable garden and cooking, baking, canning, making ice cream, and pretty much anything else in the kitchen. I love to read, compete in trivia contests, and attempt to keep up with my Netflix queue.
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