Love letters from WWII

Jennie Lombardo was 15 and Frank Caputo was 22 when he joined the Army to serve in World War II. And that was the beginning of him sending love letters to her. Jennie and Frank married after the war and had 6 children, who brought them 8 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Frank passed away in 1984.

In 2001, at age 74, Jennie was preparing to move to a new home and came across a box with 429 letters that Frank sent her from 1942-1945. She spent a week putting them in chronological order and reading them. As Jennie describes it, “reading his letters brought his image back to life for me. I could feel the warmth of them, coming out of the letters.”

Jennie and Frank’s daughter, Joanne Caputo, created this wonderful short film to share the story of their relationship, and the impact that letter collection had on her mother.

We were touched by this charming video, and it reminded us how important it is to record favorite memories from our parents and grandparents while we still can. There’s nothing that brings our past to life like personal reminiscences.

About Katie

I joined Legacy.com in 2002 as a part-time content screener and now serve as Director of Operations, overseeing Legacy’s day-to-day operations (Guest Book screening, obituary processing, customer service, and client service). I grew up in California, the daughter of a psychologist and a minister. My parents instilled in me the importance of listening to and caring about others. One of the things I appreciate most about working at Legacy.com is that I am able to have a small part in easing people's pain during one of the most difficult times in their lives. In my life outside of Legacy, I enjoy baking treats (and bringing them to the office to share), playing the piano, reading, taking pictures, tending to our vegetable & herb gardens, trying out new restaurants and foods, spending time with my husband, Chuck (whom I met at Legacy) and our kids, Brett Jr. & Josie, and playing with our hound dogs, Mugsy and Bo Jangles.
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